sustainability-picOne of the mantras of modern management, ‘you can’t manage it if you don’t measure it’, certainly applies to supply chain sustainability. However, sustainability is often a moving target since almost every supply chain is different. A good way to find some commonality as a basis for understanding the term is to take a look at how businesses measure it.

process updateSometimes "The Payoff" writes about you. Sometimes it's about your customers. Installments like "Qthru Aims for a Different Self Check-Out" obviously apply to the many readers working in retail organizations: a better way to get shoppers through check-out certainly matters to you. Why waste space, though, on currency exchange in Malta or ordering pencils in Pretoria?

pointofsalePoint of sale (POS) data has long been the domain of the retailer that collects it. It hasn’t always available – in detail, anyway – to manufacturers and suppliers that could use the data for such things as demand planning, improving supply chains to avoid stock outs and to better understand and act on buying habits so they can more accurately allocate advertising dollars. Of course, all those benefits would in turn benefit the retailers, which could improve planning and forecasting, reduce (or eliminate) stock outs, and even have leverage to enact and enforce service level agreements with suppliers.

Debbie IrwinScott Koegler of ec-bp.com talks with Debbie Irwin of Land-O-Lakes about her quest to find tools to manage data about the company's products.

 

 

 

risk2I help my buddy Buzz select articles for the Supply Chain Buzz page every week (our motto: “we read ‘em so you don’t have to!”). We review a range of stories and blogs on the subjects of supply chain, electronic commerce, ERP, continuous improvement, and general management. Since there’s a great diversity of jobs, departments, and company sizes among our readers, not all will be on target. However, we noticed a few themes that cut across nearly all jobs and organizations. Let’s take a look at a prominent one: risk.

google-wallet-xlI don't know, and I don't care.

Not exactly, but almost. A couple of weeks ago, reader Mike reacted to "Google Wallet: High Risk, High Reward" with sensible questions:

risk2I help my buddy Buzz select articles for the Supply Chain Buzz page every week (our motto: “we read ‘em so you don’t have to!”). We review a range of stories and blogs on the subjects of supply chain, electronic commerce, ERP, continuous improvement, and general management. Since there’s a great diversity of jobs, departments, and company sizes among our readers, not all will be on target. However, we noticed a few themes that cut across nearly all jobs and organizations. Let’s take a look at a prominent one: risk.

next big thingThose of us who have been around ecommerce for a few years can probably remember hearing or reading about the ‘next big thing’. Whether that next big thing was handwriting recognition software, the ‘netbook’, server virtualization, or internet TV, it’s been a little hit or miss. That’s to be expected; things move quickly in this hyperconnected world, and technology never stands still.

shiptrackingOnce an order leaves a warehouse, it’s anyone’s guess what happens to the goods and when they will arrive at their final destination. At least, that’s how it goes for many retailers right now.

200px-Google-Wallet-logo.svgGoogle Wallet has a lot to overcome. Not even a year old as of this writing, it has already weathered enough bad news to capsize less well-supported projects. Google continues to invest in it, though, and seems committed to sticking with Wallet until it succeeds.