big data posPoint of sale (POS) data has long been the domain of the retailer that collects it. It hasn’t always available – in detail, anyway – to manufacturers and suppliers that could use the data for such things as demand planning, improving supply chains to avoid stock outs and to better understand and act on buying habits so they can more accurately allocate advertising dollars. Of course, all those benefits would in turn benefit the retailers, which could improve planning and forecasting, reduce (or eliminate) stock outs, and even have leverage to enact and enforce service level agreements with suppliers.

EMRThe age of digital medical records has elevated the urgency with which hospitals and other medical providers need to integrate all of their procurement processes, maintain control of the data and inventory, all while decreasing costs. In order to meet those demanding challenges, hospitals are being forced to adapt new best practices and technologies. However, the mere presence of shiny, new technology does not necessarily guarantee every cog will function as it should and the increasing need for information will be sated. In addition for access to desired information, hospitals and medical facilities also need the data to be in the right format, available on-demand and accessible to the right people.

Red-important-stampIt used to be tough to talk EDI with a retailer: “Why should I replace a convenient FAX P/O that goes directly to the keypunch operator with a 'rip and read' document that must go through the data processing department before we ever get it?" The introduction of the electronic invoice caught their attention with faster payments. Now a host of new capabilities are available to help the retailer.

winter stormBoston and much of the nation’s East Coast might have been buried under piles of snow during the winter of 2015, but the retail industry itself did not get buried. How can that be, considering roads were impassable for days in many areas, freezing temperatures were ideal for snowman survival and people were just plain miserable?

no-onlineIn retail, EVERYBODY must (or thinks they must), be prominent in e-retailing and omnichannel because of ALL the revenue. So Primark must be joking to think they can remain just simply brick & mortar? But when Sears shuts down stores, UK-based Primark buys them to expand into the US. Keep thinking of an old saying: “Jack of All Trades, and Master of None”. Bet Primark has heard of it.