scheduleUnless an organization is starting jobs using an adhoc method, scheduling plays a major role in EDI implementations. Scheduling during EDI projects is unfortunately very often taken for granted. However, very frequently a lot of EDI jobs error out in their first few weeks of production because enough thought does not go into the scheduling process.

 

ScheduleEntrySome organizations (especially Fortune 1000 companies) chose to use enterprise level job scheduling software (aka Workload automation) for all IT jobs not just EDI. The enterprise scheduling software is maintained by the IT operations team and includes dozens of other jobs in addition to EDI such as mainframe jobs, SAP jobs, PeopleSoft jobs and etc. The scheduling software has adapters installed on the servers where the jobs are actually executed and they run as a service. Then the operations team uses a client version of the software to set up the jobs and monitor them. Some examples of popular job schedulers (in no particular order) are Control-M, Tidal Enterprise Scheduler, BMC CONTROL-M, and IBM Tivoli Workload Scheduler. There are a also half-a-dozen open-source job schedulers out there as well.

mobile-appsSeems like today, given the fact just about everyone has a mobile phone (including the four-year-old my daughter played with today; granted it was a hand-me down from the parents, but it still worked!), that supply chain executives would want to access pertinent data away from their desks, while out and about and on the move.

dashboard1There’s nothing necessarily new about dashboards – software that serves as a control panels for enterprise applications and provides high-level views of a variety of performance and data-intensive information. But what’s clear is their growing importance for supply chain managers.

IntegrationThis week I wrote about how VANs have evolved, and in my conversations while researching the article one resounding theme kept surfacing: integration.