Cloud-ArrowCIOs know, you know, I know that organizations need to utilize Cloud-based applications and infrastructure so that they are digitally competitive. Why are perceived budget and security concerns stymying digital initiatives?


The path to cloud computing has turned into a highway. But, many CIOs / senior executives are not riding that highway. A new report from cloud provider Canopy, is based on a survey of 950 CIOs and other key executives.

The survey reported fear that businesses will become uncompetitive, with a large majority (74 percent) believing this will happen as soon as the next 15 months. In fact, these executives estimate that their businesses lost a collective $41 billion in revenues last year due to the lack of ideal cloud solutions. Wait a minute, they know something is very wrong; shouldn't this be a huge priority?

The reasons for the Cloud are all over the business: in marketing & sales, operations, human resources. While 94 percent recognized the need to embrace cloud-based applications and infrastructure to deliver digital transformation, more than two-thirds (68 percent) admitted that a lack of cloud investment was holding back their company’s vital digital initiatives. The CIO's no longer control investment and operations like they once did; so their role really becomes the “preacher” of the Cloud who reaches all across the organization.

The Canopy survey identifies (real and imaginary) show-stoppers: security (60 percent), data protection (40 percent), protection of intellectual property (26 percent), and fears of vendor lock-in (36 percent).

When I am faced with making a decision, I find I can think better if I make a list. Let's make up our own list of “good” things and then “nebulous” things about Big Data and the Cloud:

Good things about cloud and big data

  • We have some high-profile vendors such as Amazon Web Services, Google, Microsoft, IBM and Rackspace who offer cloud-based Hadoop and NoSQL database platforms to support big data applications. None of them are about to close up on you (maybe merge?)

  • There are now many managed services that run on top of the cloud platforms, freeing users from the need to deploy their own systems there. This eliminates your need to have “super programmer” on your staff to run the Cloud.

  • Mixing big data and cloud computing is often the first choice for Internet companies, especially software and data services vendors that are just getting started themselves. Hey, this is their whole survival.

  • If you have resources like this and important companions too; why aren't they not sleeping at night because of concerns about data security and privacy protections in the cloud? Vendors can provide you with recommendations.

  • You still run most of their operations on mainframes and other archaic systems far removed from cloud architectures. And the sheer mass of data stored in such systems is so extensive. Etc, etc. ... Sounds cheap now, but those old fully-depreciated computer rooms will need replacement sooner than you think.

  • Start ups too: If you are in the Big Data business, buying servers are the last thing you need when you want to focus on your business, not your infrastructure.

Nebulous things about cloud and big data

Ooops! Can't think of anything else

As Bob Dylan once said: “The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind”.
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